August 2020

Ospreys
Balbuzards pêcheurs

Ospreys640

Ospreys
Cooper Marsh Conservation Area, South Lancaster, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2020

Once or twice a year, Robert and I visit the Cooper Marsh Conservation Area, a significant wetland in Ontario which hosts numerous wildlife species. Wetland birds that breed at Cooper Marsh include the Osprey, American Bittern, Virginia Rail, Sora, Green Heron, Wood Duck, Pied Billed Grebe, Black-Crowned Night Heron, Sandhill Cranes and the rare Least Bittern. The Marsh contains a wide variety of amphibians, turtles and fish. During spring and fall migrations, many bird species visit the Marsh.

Osprey are most often seen near open water and marshes, since their diet consists mainly of fish. On an early spring visit, Robert took photos as an adult Osprey was about to land on the branch below which another was already perched. I like to think that they were enjoying a little bit of freedom prior to performing their nesting duties. The old dead tree has been a favoured perching spot for years, but unfortunately on our last visit most of the tree had fallen.

I was curious about those Ospreys so I contacted the office of the Raisin Region Conservation Authority (RRCA;
https://rrca.on.ca) to enquire about the birds and they kindly answered my questions.

Osprey have been nesting yearly at Cooper Marsh since 2011. Currently there is one resident nesting pair in the middle of the Marsh. Three platforms were constructed over the years to encourage Osprey to nest there, only one of which is currently utilized. Throughout Lake St. Francis there were upwards of 20 nesting pairs during the 2019 season. Osprey within Lake St. Francis area tend to fledge between 1 and 3 young annually.

RRCA and CMC (Cooper Marsh Conservators) both raise funds for the Marsh so I have donated my painting of the Ospreys to help with the fund raising.

Find out about the staff and volunteers who accomplish vital work to protect this important wetland by visiting
https://rrca.on.ca/page.php?id=44.

+ + +

Balbuzards pêcheurs
Zone de conservation du Marais Cooper, South Lancaster, Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2020

Une fois ou deux l’an, Robert et moi visitons le Marais Cooper, une zone de conservation importante des milieux humides en Ontario. Parmi les oiseaux de marais qui s’y reproduisent on retrouve entre autre : le Balbuzard pêcheur, le Butor d’Amérique, le Râle de Virginie, la Marouette de Caroline, le Héron vert, le Canard branchu, le Grèbe à bec bigarré, le Bihoreau gris, la Grue du Canada et le Petit Blongios dont l’espèce est menacée. On y retrouve aussi une variété d’amphibiens, tortues et poissons. Lors de la migration du printemps et de l’automne, plusieurs espèces d’oiseaux visitent le Marais.

On aperçoit le Balbuzard pêcheur le long des grands lacs, fleuves, rivières et marais car il se nourrit principalement de poisson. En début de printemps, Robert a saisi quelques photos au moment où un adulte allait se poser sur la branche située sous l’oiseau déjà perché. J’aime croire qu’ils profitaient de leur liberté avant d’entreprendre leur rôle exigeant de soins parentaux. Pendant des années, l’arbre mort était leur perchoir favori. À notre dernière visite, une partie de l’arbre est malheureusement tombée dans le marais.

J’étais curieuse envers cette paire de Balbuzards pêcheurs et j’ai joint l’Office de la protection de la nature de la région de Raisin (Raisin Region Conservation Authority, RRCA;
https://rrca.on.ca) pour m’informer sur ces oiseaux et ils ont eu la gentillesse de me répondre.

Depuis 2011, le Balbuzard pêcheur niche
à tous les ans au Marais Cooper. Cependant, une seule paire y a construit son nid au milieu du Marais. Au fil des ans, trois plateformes ont été installées pour encourager le Balbuzard pêcheur à y construire son nid mais une seule plateforme est utilisée. Lors de la période de reproduction en 2019, on a observé plus d’une vingtaine de couples qui nichaient le long du lac Saint-François. Le Balbuzard pêcheur que l’on retrouve le long du Lac Saint-François produit entre 1 et 3 jeunes par année.

Le RRCA et le CMC (Cooper Marsh Conservators) amassent des fonds pour le Marais alors j’ai fait don de ma toile des Balbuzards pêcheurs pour aider.

Pour en savoir plus sur le personnel et les bénévoles qui se dévouent
à protéger cette zone humide importante, voici le lien : https://rrca.on.ca/page.php?id=44.

Trumpeter Swans
Cygnes trompette

TrumpeterSwans640

Trumpeter Swans
Pemberton Valley, B.C.
Oil on canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

I was inspired to do this painting after my friend Brenda Williams sent me several photos she took of these Trumpeter swans. We share a passion for birds and occasionally she provides me with fantastic material to paint from. Painting birds is a recent interest for me, which holds many challenges. I am very grateful for her encouragement.

During the spring migration in February, Trumpeter swans pass through the north Pemberton Valley of British Columbia to feed and rest before heading north to Alaska.

Located at the end of the Pemberton Valley is the volcano, Mount Meager.

+ + + +

Cygnes trompette
Vallée de Pemberton, C.-B.
Huile sur toile
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

Mon amie Brenda Williams m’a envoyé des photos qu’elle a prises lors du passage des Cygnes trompette dans la Vallée de Pemberton. Nous partageons la même passion pour les oiseaux et parfois elle m’offre de merveilleux sujets à peindre. J’apprécie énormément son appui.

La migration printanière des Cygnes trompette a lieu en février. Les cygnes s’arrêtent dans la Vallée de Pemberton en Colombie-Britannique pour se reposer et se nourrir avant de poursuivre leur trajet en direction nord, vers l’Alaska.

À la limite de la Vallée de Pemberton se trouve le volcan, Mount Meager.

Cape Spear
Cap Spear

CapeSpear640

Cape Spear
Lighthouse National Historic Site, N.L.
Oil on birch panel
50.8 cm x 40.64 cm (20” x 16”) - 2020

Our first visit to Newfoundland and Labrador was in 2005. We had an amazing week in Gros Morne National Park, which offers breathtaking and unexpected sights like the astonishing Tablelands. As we followed a 4 km trail there, the barren landscape gave me an eerie impression of being on another planet.

We walked the 3 km trail to Western Brook Pond fjord. I wish we could have taken the boat tour, but I am prone to motion sickness.

It was delightful to discover along the coast the fishing villages of Trout River, Woody Point and Norris Point, to name a few.

During our second week, we slept at a B&B in Witless Bay. Unfortunately, thick fog and pouring rain settled in during our stay, so we had to change many plans.

One morning we drove to Cape St. Mary’s Ecological Reserve bird sanctuary located on the southwest corner of the Avalon Peninsula. We hoped the fog would lift by the time we arrived but it did not. We went to the Interpretation Centre to enquire if it was safe to go to the Bird Rock, where northern gannets and several other bird species nest. It is only a 1 km footpath and they advised that we remain on the trail. The path was a bit slippery, and as our walk progressed I noticed poop along the trail. I mean, a lot of poop! I asked Robert if he knew what animal would produce such volume. He had no clue. It made me feel uneasy but we kept walking and I was very careful not to step in it.

I raised my head to see where Robert was and saw a large shape heading towards me. The fog was too dense and I could not figure out what it was. For a second, maybe 2 or 3, my heart stopped. Then another similar shape appeared and another. Sheep! Huge sheep! We had never seen such big sheep. What a relief!

Since the fog persisted, we could not see the birds but I will never forget the powerful sound of the waves crashing against the cliffs, the strong smell in the air, the screeching cries of the thousands of birds and the deafening sound of the foghorn coming from the Coast Guard lighthouse.

Our trip ended in St. John’s where we spent 2 nights. The weather was a bit more cooperative so we walked the city streets, strolled along the harbour, enjoyed fantastic food, savoured treats in coffee shops, visited The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery and museum along with other art galleries.

One morning we drove from St. John’s to Cape Spear, where the sun first rises in North America, to see the oldest surviving lighthouse in Newfoundland and Labrador. On the other side of the ocean facing the lighthouse is Ireland. So close and yet so far away. Much marine history is attached to the lighthouses along the coast, as lives depended on them. I can only imagine the relief of fishermen in their small boats and of people aboard ships, seeing lights in the distance, hope and safety.

+ + + +

Cap Spear
Lieu historique national du Phare-de-Cap-Spear, T.-N.-L.
Huile sur panneau de bois
50.8 cm x 40.64 cm (20” x 16”) - 2020

Notre premier voyage à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador remonte en 2005. Nous avons passé une semaine formidable à découvrir le Parc National Gros Morne où des scènes époustouflantes nous attendaient avec des paysages étonnants comme les Tablelands. En parcourant la piste de 4 km de ce paysage dénudé au sol aride, j’avais la curieuse impression d’être sur une autre planète.

Pour nous rendre au fjord Western Brook Pond nous avons parcouru un sentier de 3 km. J’aurais tellement aimé faire la tournée en bateau mais le mal de mer m’en a empêchée.

Découvrir la nature et les villages des pêcheurs dispersés le long de la côte fut un réel plaisir pour nous deux.

La deuxième semaine, nous avons séjourné dans une maison d’hôte à Witless Bay. Pendant plusieurs jours un épais brouillard et une pluie incessante nous ont empêché de poursuivre nos activités.

Un jour, nous nous sommes rendus à la Réserve Écologique de Cap St. Mary’s située au sud-ouest de la Péninsule d’Avalon. Nous espérions que le brouillard serait dissipé à notre arrivée mais ce ne fut pas le cas.

Au Centre d’interprétation on nous a fortement suggéré de ne pas dévier du sentier qui longe les falaises sur une distance de 1 km avant d’arriver au Bird Rock, là où les Fous de Bassan et bien d’autres espèces d’oiseaux y font leurs nids.

Le sol était glissant et couvert de crottes. J’ai demandé à Robert s’il savait de quel animal il s’agissait. Il n’avait aucune idée. Malgré mes craintes, nous avons poursuivi notre trajet et j’évitais autant que possible à mettre les pieds dedans.

En levant la tête pour voir où se trouvait Robert, une forme imposante avançait vers moi. L’épais brouillard m’empêchait de distinguer ce que c’était et j’avoue que l’espace de quelques secondes le coeur m’a manqué. Une autre forme est apparue et une autre. Des moutons ! D’énormes moutons ! Quel soulagement !

Arrivés au Bird Rock, nous pouvions à peine distinguer les oiseaux toujours à cause du brouillard. Cependant, je n’oublierai jamais le fracas des vagues qui s’écrasaient avec puissance au pied des falaises, la senteur de l’air marin, les cris stridents de milliers d’oiseaux et le son assourdissant de la sirène du phare de la Garde Côtière.

Notre voyage s’est terminé avec un séjour de 2 nuits à St. John’s. La température étant plus clémente, nous avons parcouru à pied les rues de la ville et le port, savouré de bons repas et petites gâteries dans les cafés, visité The Rooms et plusieurs galeries d’art.

Un matin nous avons fait le trajet entre St. John’s et Cap Spear où se trouve le plus ancien phare de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. L’endroit où le soleil se lève en premier en Amérique du Nord. De l’autre côté de l’océan, faisant face au phare, se trouve l’Irlande. Si proche et pourtant si loin.

Tant d’histoires sont reliées aux phares qui longent la côte car les vies dépendaient de ceux-ci. J’imagine le soulagement ressenti par les pêcheurs à bord de leurs petits bateaux ou les gens sur les navires en apercevant la lumière d’un phare au loin, l’espoir et la sécurité.

Mute Swan
Cygne tuberculé

MuteSwan640

Mute Swan
Holiday Beach Conservation Area
Near Amherstburg, south of Windsor, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

It is disheartening to see the devastation caused by COVID-19 across the planet. My heart goes out to the families grieving the loss of a loved one.

I am thankful to all health care personnel who put themselves at risk for us, to front-line and essential workers for keeping our country going while so many Canadians stay home to prevent the spread of the virus. Thank you to farmers, grocery store employees, cashiers and truckers for ensuring we have food on our tables, access to pharmaceutical medications and products we need in our daily lives. Thank you to the federal, provincial and municipal politicians and employees and to the numerous businesses for their support and collaboration during this pandemic.

In the midst of this global tragedy I try to find some peace of mind through my art, and as always my sources of inspiration are nature and birds.

In June 2015, Robert and I went to the observation tower of Holiday Beach Conservation Area, which is located about an hour west of Point Pelee National Park.

From the observation tower Robert took several photos of a swan as it lifted off the marshy water. As its wings slapped the water’s surface it produced an astonishing sound. It was impressive watching this large and magnificent bird gain altitude, a scene of simple beauty and freedom.

Take good care of yourselves and your families.

+ + + +

Cygne tuberculé ou Cygne muet
Holiday Beach Conservation Area (Zone de conservation)
Près d’Amherstburg, au sud de Windsor, Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

C’est tellement triste de voir tous les ravages causés par le virus COVID-19 sur notre belle planète. Mes sincères condoléances aux familles qui ont perdu un être cher.

Merci à tous les employés des soins de santé qui se mettent à risque pour nous, aux employés de première ligne et des services essentiels qui gardent le fort alors que nous sommes confinés à la maison afin de prévenir la propagation du virus. Merci aux agriculteurs, aux employés et caissières dans les épiceries et aux camionneurs. Grâce à vous, nous avons de la nourriture sur nos tables, accès aux médicaments pharmaceutiques et aux produits nécessaires du quotidien. Merci aux nombreuses entreprises, aux politiciens fédéraux, provinciaux et municipaux ainsi qu’aux employés de la fonction publique pour votre soutien et solidarité durant cette pandémie.

Je garde le moral à travers ma peinture et comme toujours, mes sources d’inspiration sont la nature et les oiseaux.

En juin 2015, Robert et moi avons visité le “Holiday Beach Conservation Area”, situé à l’ouest du parc national de la Pointe-Pelée.

De la tour d’observation, Robert a pris plusieurs photos de cet énorme oiseau alors qu’il prenait son envol des eaux marécageuses. En frappant la surface de l’eau avec ses ailes, il produisait un son incroyable. C’était impressionnant voir ce magnifique cygne s’élevé dans les airs. Une scène d’une grande simplicité et de liberté.

Prenez bien soin de vous et votre famille.

Yellow Warbler
Paruline jaune

YellowWarbler640

Yellow Warbler - male
Lighthouse Trail
Presqu’ile Provincial Park, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
15.24 cm x 20.32 cm (6” x 8”) - 2019

Last May, we went on a birding trip to Presqu'ile Provincial Park. Walking along the Lighthouse Trail, I stopped to bask in the surroundings and listen to the songs of the birds. You cannot always see birds through the tree foliage, but you certainly can hear them.

Near me, a bird sang. I slowly turned around and saw this Yellow Warbler perched on a branch above my head. His striking plumage took my breath away and his song filled my heart with happiness. What a privilege to be so close to this charming bird!

Before he flew away, I took some photos but I received so much more pleasure admiring him up close. It is magical that such a small creature has the power to enrich our lives.

+ + + + +

Paruline jaune - male
Sentier Lighthouse
Parc provincial Presqu’île - Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
15.24 cm x 20.32 cm (6” x 8”) - 2019

En mai dernier, nous avons visité le parc provincial Presqu’île afin d’observer les oiseaux. En me promenant le long du sentier Lighthouse, je me suis arrêtée pour prendre le temps de m’imprégner des lieux. S’il est parfois difficile d’apercevoir les oiseaux à travers le feuillage des arbres, leur chant n’en demeure pas moins ravissant.

Tout près de moi, un oiseau se mit à chanter. Lentement, je me suis tournée pour le repérer. Perchée sur une branche au-dessus de ma tête, se trouvait cette Paruline Jaune. Son plumage jaune vif m’a émerveillée et son chant a rempli mon coeur de joie. Quel privilège !

Avant qu’il ne s’envole, j’ai réussi à prendre quelques photos. Cependant, mon plaisir fut de pouvoir l’admirer à ma guise. C’est merveilleux qu’une si petite créature puisse illuminer nos vie par sa présence.

Winter
L'hiver

WinterMerBleueTrail640

Winter
Mer Bleue
Conservation area - Eastern Ontario
Oil on birch panel
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

Mer Bleue is one of our favourite destinations for a walk in the forest. We are so fortunate to have access to this conservation area which consists of a bog and several walking and hiking trails. Some trails have a picnic area so we can prolong our stay in nature and enjoy eating outdoors. These trails are very popular in the winter for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

We make sure to bring along sunflower seeds, because as you enter the woods cheerful chickadees greet people. They are looking for food and if you extend your hand with sunflower seeds in your palm, they will fly down and pick one up, sometimes taking their time to select the best one, before flying to a nearby branch where they break the shell with their small beaks to get at the seed inside.

The deeper you walk into the woods, you are sure to hear busy woodpeckers digging holes in a tree in search of food. If you look carefully in the direction of where the sound is coming from, you will catch sight of the bird at work.

When I walk into the forest, life becomes simpler and peaceful. The smell of the trees and the earth bring my senses to another place. The sound of our footsteps on the ground is pleasing and has a calming effect on me. I savour this precious moment with my husband, Robert.

+ + + +

L’hiver
Mer Bleue
Zone de conservation - Est de l’Ontario
Huile sur panneau de bois
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2020

Mer Bleue est l’une de nos destinations préférées quand on a le goût d’aller se promener dans les bois. Nous sommes privilégiés d’avoir accès à cette zone de conservation où l’on retrouve une tourbière ainsi que plusieurs sentiers de randonnées. Sur certains sentiers, il existe des aires de pique-nique nous permettant ainsi de prolonger notre aventure dans la nature et savourer un bon repas en plein air. En hiver, ces sentiers sont populaires pour les adeptes du ski de fond et de la raquette.

Nous apportons toujours des graines de tournesol car à l’entrée du sentier, des mésanges à tête noire accueillent les visiteurs en quête de nourriture. En allongeant le bras, ces oiseaux viennent cueillir les graines dans le creux de notre main. Parfois, ils prennent leur temps pour choisir les meilleures ! Puis, les mésanges s’envolent sur une branche où elles brisent l’écaille avec leur bec pour saisir la graine qui se trouve à l’intérieur.

Nos promenades à la Mer Bleue sont toujours agréables. J’ai l’impression que plus on s’enfonce dans la forêt, plus la vie devient simple et paisible. La senteur des arbres et le son apaisant de nos pas sur le sol de la forêt me transporte dans un autre univers et je savoure pleinement ce précieux moment avec mon époux, Robert.

Along Icefields Parkway
Le long de la Promenade des Glaciers

Along IcefieldsParkway640

Along Icefields Parkway
Jasper National Park, Alta.
Oil on birch panel
50.8 cm x 60.96 cm (20” x 24”) - 2020

In a previous Facebook post, dated August 10, 2018 titled Icefields Parkway, I wrote about our trip to the Rockies and the drive along the Icefields Parkway between Jasper and Banff. This painting represents another scene from that trip.

It is a bold and unusual composition for me but this is what I love about nature. What struck me was the prominent face and the rich colours of this imposing rock cliff. It has a dramatic impact that makes one wonder and marvel at how life can exist in such a harsh environment.

+ + + +

Le long de la Promenade des Glaciers
Parc national Jasper, Alb.
Huile sur panneau de bois
50.8 cm x 60.96 cm (20” x 24”) - 2020

Le 10 août 2018, j’ai affiché sur Facebook une toile et un texte intitulés : La Promenade des Glaciers, décrivant notre voyage dans les Rocheuses ainsi que le trajet parcouru entre Jasper et Banff. Cette toile représente une autre scène prise lors de ce voyage.

Ce paysage insolite, dominé par cette imposante falaise m’a incitée à le peindre. La falaise m’a impressionnée, non seulement par sa présence mais aussi par la beauté de ses couleurs. C’est incroyable que la vie subsiste malgré tout dans un environment aussi dur et impitoyable !

Twisted Pine
Pin tordu

TwistedPine640

Twisted Pine
Lighthouse Point Trail
Killbear Provincial Park, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2019

In September 2019, we visited the northern part of Georgian Bay. We drove up the Ottawa valley to North Bay, then across to Sudbury and Parry Sound.

Science North in Sudbury is a must see. We spent hours learning about animals, snakes, birds, insects, spiders, including large tarantulas and enormous cockroaches. I learned that turtles are scavengers and watched a mid-sized one being fed dead mice!

We went on several hikes in Killarney Provincial Park and especially enjoyed the Chikanishing Trail. It is a 3 km (1.5 hours) trail, classified as moderate due to the rocky terrain.

Driving to Parry Sound was unpleasant. Pouring rain and thunder all day and night. Our reward for this lousy weather was an excellent dinner at the Log Cabin Inn. The place was packed with people and the food was fantastic!

On Saturday morning we drove to Killbear Provincial Park and walked the Lighthouse Point Trail (800 m loop). An easy to moderate rocky trail with many exposed roots. The water level of Lake Huron was high, and in some areas along the trail, waves came crashing almost to the tips of our hiking boots. I stopped often to listen to the sound of the waves and feel the strong wind on my face. I filled my lungs with fresh air and savoured the moment.

And this is where Twisted Pine and I met. An emotional and powerful encounter that made me tear up.

What strongly appeals to me about this ageing and wounded tree is its determination to live as it fights back against nature’s harsh elements. With its exposed roots solidly anchored to the rocks, it is not going anywhere! It is resilient, stubborn, strong and beautiful, an homage to life.

Huntsville was our last destination, and the next morning we headed east through Algonquin Park. The drive back was lovely, and the sun highlighted the autumn colours that had just started to show.

+ + + +

Pin Tordu
Sentier de la pointe Lighthouse
Parc provincial Killbear, Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2019

En septembre dernier, nous avons visité le nord de la baie Georgienne. En passant par la Vallée de l’Outaouais nous nous sommes rendus à North Bay puis Sudbury et Parry Sound.

À Sudbury, nous avons visité Science Nord et avons passé des heures à observer des animaux, serpents, oiseaux, insectes, araignées et tarentules ainsi que d’énormes coquerelles aussi appelées blattes ou cafards. J’ignorais que les tortues sont des charognards et j’en ai vu une avaler des souris mortes!

Au parc provincial Killarney, nous avons fait plusieurs randonnées et nous avons tout particulièrement apprécié parcourir le sentier Chikanishing. Un terrain rocheux de 3km (1.5 heures). Niveau modéré.

Sous une tempête de pluie et de tonnerre, le trajet entre Killarney et Parry Sound fut éprouvant. Notre récompense pour avoir subi ce misérable temps de canard fut un excellent souper au Log Cabin Inn. L’endroit était bondé de monde et la nourriture délicieuse !

Samedi matin, nous nous sommes rendus au parc provincial Killbear et avons entrepris le sentier de la pointe Lighthouse (une boucle de 800 m). Le niveau du lac Huron était élevé et à certains endroits les vagues effleuraient presque la pointe de nos bottes de randonnées. Je me suis souvent arrêtée pour remplir mes poumons d’air frais, savourer le vent sur mon visage et écouter avec plaisir le son des vagues.

C’est là que Pin Tordu et moi avons fait connaissance. Le courage de ce majestueux pin âgé, blessé et démuni m’a émue aux larmes.

Avec panache, il affiche une détermination exceptionnelle. Au fil des ans, il a grandi et s’est taillé une place. Sa place. Son puissant désir de vivre le pousse à lutter contre les cruels assauts des éléments naturels. Son tronc est tordu et il a perdu plusieurs branches. Mais, ses racines exposées sont fermement agrippées au rocher. Il ne lâche pas. Il est résilient. Il est beau et fier. Un merveilleux hommage à la vie.  

Notre voyage s’est terminé à Huntsville et le lendemain matin nous avons traversé le Parc Algonquin pour retourner à la maison. Le soleil caressait les premières couleurs automnales. C’était beau !

Green Heron
Héron vert

GreenHeron

Green Heron
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

While on vacation in Costa Rica, our friend Barb went on a nature tour with a group. From a slow moving boat she took photos of birds and other wildlife which she later sent me to use for my artwork. I am fortunate to have good friends who kindly provide me with fantastic material to paint. Through their eyes, I discover new worlds.

The scene Barb captured greatly appealed to me because this secretive bird, about the size of a crow, was caught hunting in its habitat. Standing still on the branch above the water, it was about to strike for food, either a small fish or a frog.

While creating this painting, it was easy to imagine life in such a sinister environment. I could feel the eerie ambiance of a hot and humid day in a swamp dense with branches and foliage and murky waters. All creatures must be on guard as a predator can quickly become prey.

+ + + +

Héron vert
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

En voyage au Costa Rica, notre amie Barb s’est jointe à un groupe pour faire une tournée en bateau. Comme celui-ci avançait lentement sur l’eau, elle a pris des photos d’oiseaux et d’animaux qu’elle m’a par la suite remises pour mon travail. Je suis privilégiée d’avoir des amis qui m’offrent du matériel fantastique à peindre. À travers leur regard, je découvre des univers fabuleux.

La scène du Héron vert prise alors qu’il chassait dans son habitat naturel, m’interpellait énormément. Perché sur la branche au-dessus de l’eau, il était sur le point d’attraper un petit poisson ou une grenouille pour se nourrir.

En peignant ce tableau, j’imaginais la vie dans ce milieu particulièrement inquiétant. Une journée chaude et humide, un marécage saturé de branches et de feuillages divers entouré d’une eau boueuse suggère la vigilance car un prédateur peut rapidement devenir une proie.

Caspian Tern
Sterne caspienne

CaspianTern

Caspian Tern
Presqu’ile Provincial Park, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2019

We went on a birding trip to Presqu’ile Provincial Park last month. Warblers had arrived and we hoped to see a few along with other bird species.

Unfortunately, Lake Ontario’s level was still high and some trails were flooded while others were muddy. We had to cut short several hikes and double back, which was disappointing. A good pair of rubber boots would have been useful, as we would at least have had access to the beach. Lesson learned for next time.

We spent time at the lighthouse watching Double-crested Cormorants zoom by as they headed for a place to swim and catch fish on the lake. We walked along the trail to the Government Dock and a few other places.

The Marsh Boardwalk Trail was flooded in some areas, so obviously it was closed. Still, we spent 40 minutes watching this Caspian Tern from the observation platform. This bird is the largest of the tern species, about the size of a seagull.

The Caspian Tern kept circling over the marsh, hunting for food. What an expert diver he was! It was too far away for me to take good pictures with my camera, so while Robert was taking photographs, I had the pleasure of watching it enjoy its natural habitat.

+ + + +

Sterne caspienne
Parc provincial Presqu’ile, Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2019

Un court séjour pour observer les oiseaux au parc provincial Presqu’ile en mai dernier nous a charmé. Les parulines étant au rendez-vous, nous espérions en voir quelques unes ainsi que bien d’autres espèces d’oiseaux.

Comme le niveau du lac Ontario était encore élevé, certains sentiers étaient inondés alors que d’autres étaient boueux. À contrecoeur, nous avons rebrousser chemin à plusieurs reprises. Une paire de bottes en caoutchouc aurait été fort utiles car nous aurions pu nous rendre à la plage. Une bonne leçon pour la prochaine fois !

Nous avons passé un certain temps près du phare à surveiller des Cormorans à aigrettes voler au-dessus du lac Ontario afin de trouver un endroit où nager et pêcher. Par la suite, nous nous sommes promenés le long du sentier Government Dock ainsi qu’à d’autres endroits.

Le sentier Marsh était inondé, donc fermé. Heureusement, la tour d’observation située à l’entrée du sentier était accessible. De là, nous avons observé pendant plus de 40 minutes cette Sterne caspienne. C’est le plus gros oiseau de son espèce avec une taille semblable à celle d’un goéland.

En quête de nourriture, la Sterne caspienne survolait le marais. Cet oiseau est un champion du plongeon ! Il était trop loin pour que j’obtienne de belles photos avec ma caméra alors pendant que Robert le photographiait, j’ai pu l’observer à ma guise et le voir évoluer dans son environnement naturel. C’était magnifique !

Northern Flicker
Pic Flamboyant

NorthernFlicker640

Northern Flicker
Subspecies: Red-shafted Flicker
Nanaimo, B.C.
Oil on birch panel
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

It was on a snowy December day that Tracy Fegan first saw this Northern Flicker in her backyard. Its red moustache indicates that it is a male.

It managed to find some of the fall berries still left on the Arbutus tree and it was determined to eat them. The Arbutus tree is native to the coastal northwest and produces berries which birds feed on.

I love winter and this enchanting scenery greatly appealed to me. I am grateful to Tracy for giving me permission to use her photos to create this painting.

Late this spring, I was fortunate to see a Northern Flicker visit our backyard. The fleeting sight of it gave me the nudge I needed to paint this scene.

+ + + +

Pic Flamboyant
Sous-espèce : Pic flamboyant rosé
Nanaimo, C.-B.
Huile sur panneau de bois
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

Par une journée enneigée de décembre, Tracy Fegan aperçoit pour la première fois dans sa cour arrière ce Pic Flamboyant. La moustache rouge de l’oiseau nous révèle que c’est un mâle.

Ayant déniché les dernières baies d’automne sur l’arbre fruitier, l’oiseau était bien déterminé à les manger.

J’aime l’hiver et cette scène féérique m’interpellait énormément. Aussi, je suis reconnaissante envers Tracy de m’avoir permis d’utiliser ses magnifiques photos pour la composition de cette toile.

Vers la fin du printemps de cette année, j’ai eu à mon tour le privilège d’apercevoir brièvement un Pic Flamboyant dans notre cour arrière. Je n’en revenais pas ! Cette vision éphémère m’a donné l’élan dont j’avais besoin pour peindre ce tableau.

Great Kiskadee
Tyran quiquivi

Great Kiskadees 640

Great Kiskadee - Male & female
Manzanillo, Mexico
Oil on birch panel
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

Painting this scene filled my heart with joy. Thanks to my friend, Brenda Williams who lives in Pemberton, BC, I discovered these beautiful birds through her camera lens.

Birds have always fascinated me, but it was only in 2015 that I began to paint them. I never anticipated such delight and strong desire to pursue this adventure.

Prior to beginning a painting, I spend a lot of time learning about the bird’s life and habitat. I also want to know if the species is secure, vulnerable, declining or endangered. All this valuable information helps me establish a strong bond with the bird.

Equipped with binoculars and cameras, Robert and I go on birding trips during the spring and fall migrations. Back home in the studio, I study various field guides to identify the birds we saw.

The lives of birds is wondrous and learning about them has enriched not only my art but also our lives. 

+ + + +

Tyran quiquivi - Mâle et femelle
Manzanillo, Mexique
Huile sur panneau de bois
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2019

Que j’ai aimé peindre ce tableau! Grâce à mon amie, Brenda Williams qui habite à Pemberton en Colombie-Britannique, j’ai découvert ces beaux oiseaux à travers son regard de photographe.

Ma fascination pour les oiseaux remonte à mon enfance et pourtant ce n’est qu’en 2015 que j’ai entrepris de les peindre. Ravie, je suis tombée sous leur charme et c’est à ce moment-là que j’ai décidé de foncer dans cette grande aventure.

Avant d’entreprendre une toile, je fais de la recherche pour comprendre la vie de l’oiseau et son habitat. Est-ce que l’espèce est stable, préoccupante, menacée ou en voie de disparition? Ces précieuses informations renforcent mon rapport avec l’oiseau.

Avec nos jumelles et caméras, Robert et moi partons à la recherche des oiseaux lors de la migration au printemps et à l’automne. De retour dans mon studio, je consulte divers guides d’oiseaux pour identifier ceux que nous avons vus.

Peindre et apprendre sur la vie extraordinaire des oiseaux a non seulement enrichi mon art mais aussi nos vies.

Icefields Parkway
La Promenade des Glaciers

IcefieldsParkway2-640

Icefields Parkway
Jasper National Park, Alta.
Somewhere south of the Icefields Discovery Centre
Oil on canvas
45.7 cm x 61 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

Driving along the Icefields Parkway (highway 93) between Jasper and Banff we had to stop at many lookouts, because the drive is one jaw-dropping panoramic view after another.

The vastness of the land, the grandiose landscapes filled with an endless chain of mountains, rivers and lakes, all highlighted by impressive glaciers, is spectacular. You cannot help but feel the isolation, the wilderness, the cold invading your body and the cool crisp air filling your lungs. What a stunning planet we live on!

Ever since I first saw the Canadian Rockies in 1999, I wanted to paint them but I could not figure out how to transpose such a majestic landscape onto canvas. It took me a long time to attempt this scene. Perhaps, with the distance in time I was finally able to simply paint the scene while not being overwhelmed by it.

Once I began working on the canvas I was completely immersed in my subject, and for over a week I lost track of time. I remembered how exciting it was to be there, and suddenly, under my brush strokes, I was there again and I felt the same magic.

Early in our relationship, Robert and I talked about things we would like to do in life. I mentioned that my dream was to see and paint the Canadian landscape. It turned out that he wanted to travel too! So, once a year or so, we pick a destination we would like to visit and go there. So far we have visited the Rockies three times.

+ + + +

La Promenade des Glaciers
Parc national Jasper, Alb.
Au sud du Glacier Discovery Centre
Huile sur toile
45.7 cm x 61 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

Heureusement qu’il existe de nombreux points d’observation le long de la Promenade des Glaciers (autoroute 93), entre Jasper et Banff. Cela nous permet d’arrêter et admirer d’époustouflantes vues panoramiques.

L’immensité du territoire nous offre des scènes grandioses où se trouvent une chaîne interminable de montagnes, rivières et lacs, avec en arrière-plan, d’énormes glaciers. C’est émouvant. On ressent l’isolement des lieux, la nature et le froid nous envahir alors que nos poumons se remplissent de l’air frais et piquant. Quelle planète magnifique nous habitons !

C’est en 1999 que nous avons visité les Rocheuses canadiennes pour la première fois. Je désirais peindre les Rocheuses mais ces scènes spectaculaires m’intimidaient. Comment reproduire ces paysages fabuleux sur une simple toile ? J’ai mis beaucoup de temps avant de me décider à peindre ce tableau.

Pendant plus d’une semaine j’ai perdu la notion du temps tellement j’étais absorbée par mon sujet. Chaque coup de pinceau me ramenait au jour où mon regard s’est posé sur cette scène pour l’admirer. Au fur et à mesure que la toile avançait, j’avais l’impression de me retrouver à cet endroit. C’était magique. La joie que j’avais alors ressentie est revenue m’habiter et c’est ce que j’ai voulu reproduire sur la toile.

Au début de notre relation, Robert et moi avons parlé de ce que nous aimerions faire dans la vie. Je lui ai mentionné mon grand rêve : voyager pour peindre le paysage canadien. Quelle chance car il désirait lui aussi voyager à travers le Canada ! Depuis, à chaque année, nous choisissons une destination à découvrir. Nous avons visité les Rocheuses à trois reprises.

Medicine Lake
Lac Medicine

Medicine Lake 640

Medicine Lake
Jasper National Park, Alta.
Oil on canvas
45.7 cm x 61 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

In May 1999 we took our first trip to the Canadian Rockies. Robert had a special interest in Medicine Lake and talked about it before the trip. Obviously, we had to go see the lake.

When we arrived at the lake, it’s bed was empty. With a silly smirk on my face, I couldn't resist commenting, “Hmm … Where’s the water? Doesn’t look much like a lake to me!”

He ignored my remarks and smiled because he knew the answer. I understand that things are more complex than my short description here, but this is what I understood from his explanation.

May is when the glaciers begin to melt and fill lakes and rivers. Medicine Lake is exceptional because it fills up when Maligne Lake overflows. Even though the two lakes are far apart, a long channel links them and carries the water to Medicine Lake, making it more of a large basin than a lake.

But the most intriguing and fascinating aspect of what makes Medicine Lake unique is its underground system of caves. Every year, as the overflow from Maligne Lake fills Medicine Lake, the water drains into the caves, leaving behind an empty bed with puddles of water and mud flats, and this is what we saw on our first trip. Of course the drainage happens over a period of several months.

Had I pay attention to what Robert was telling me when he talked about Medicine Lake, I would have been in a better position to understand and appreciate what I was looking at … Lesson learned!

We were lucky the second time we visited the Rockies and my painting reflects that amazing view. Taking time to absorb our surroundings and feeling part of nature was magical.

The scale of it all surpasses our imagination. In the background, you see glaciers and realize they are the ones providing the fresh water that fill in the lakes, rivers and oceans. Precious water that we need to stay alive.

Because the mountains are so immense, the evergreens at their foothills look like moss. The shores along the mountains are covered with boulders and large rocks. You can’t help but have an eerie feeling. The water of that lake is really cold! You breathe and fill your lungs with this amazing fresh air that is rejuvenating and makes you almost dizzy.

Such a strange environment for both of us and yet we really felt we belonged there.

+ + + + +

Lac Medicine
Parc national Jasper, Alb.
Huile sur toile
45.7 cm x 61 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

Notre première visite dans les Rocheuses canadiennes remonte à mai 1999. En planifiant le voyage, Robert était bien intrigué et parlait souvent du Lac Medicine. C’était clair, nous devions aller voir ce lac.

À notre arrivée, le lit du lac était vide. Avec un sourire un peu narquois, je n’ai pas pu m’empêcher d’émettre un petit commentaire : “ Hé ben, dis-donc Robert … où est l’eau ? Ça ne ressemble pas tellement à un lac ! “

Il a ignoré mes remarques et a sourit avant de m’expliquer la scène qui se trouvait devant nous. C’est un peu compliqué mais voici ce que j’ai compris.

La fonte des glaciers commence en mai et c’est ainsi que se remplissent les lacs et rivières. Le scénario est différent pour le Lac Medicine. Son lit se remplit lorsque le Lac Maligne, situé beaucoup plus loin, déborde. Un long passage relie les deux lacs et le surplus d’eau du Lac Maligne se déverse dans le Lac Medicine qui est en somme un énorme bassin plutôt qu’un lac.

Le Lac Medicine est unique car il possède un réseau souterrain de cavernes. Sur une période de plusieurs mois, le lac se vide car l’eau s’écoule dans les cavernes, laissant derrière des flaques d’eau et des bancs de boue. C’est ce que nous avons vu lors de notre première visite.

Si j’avais écouté les explications de Robert quand il me parlait du Lac Medicine, j’aurais compris et apprécié ce que je voyais … Petite leçon pour le futur !

Ma toile représente la scène que nous avons admirée lors de notre seconde visite dans les Rocheuses. Un moment magique.

Cette nature dépasse l’imagination. À l’arrière-plan de ce paysage, se trouvent les glaciers qui alimentent les lacs, rivières et océans. Source d’eau potable si précieuse à la vie.

Les montagnes sont tellement énormes que les conifères situés le long des contreforts ressemblent à de la tourbe. C’est à la fois impressionnant et étrange quand notre regard se pose sur toutes ces grosses roches parsemées sur les rives. L’eau du lac est glaciale ! Prendre de grandes respirations et remplir nos poumons d’air frais nous stimule et nous étourdit.

Un endroit insolite et pourtant nous avions l’impression d’en faire partie. Nous avons pris le temps d’admirer ce spectacle grandiose. Quel privilège !

The Yellow Begonia
Le bégonia jaune

YellowBegonias640

The Yellow Begonia
Home - Orléans, Ont.
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2018

At the beginning of the year, my friend Joy and I challenged each other to produce a floral painting before the end of 2018, a challenge to take us away from our comfort zone.

Our balcony is covered by an awning to protect us from the sun. Earlier this spring, I bought plants that do well in shade, several begonias, a gorgeous fern along with other beautiful plants. I wanted to create a little oasis with lovely flowers where Robert and I can sit to read and relax.

The more I looked at it, the more I liked the yellow begonia. I finally decided it was a great subject to paint and meet the challenge, hence the very creative title, The Yellow Begonia!

+ + + +

Le bégonia jaune
Chez-nous - Orléans, Ont.
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2018

Afin de nous faire sortir de notre zone de confort, mon amie Joy et moi nous sommes lancé un défi en janvier dernier : peindre des fleurs d’ici la fin de l’année 2018.

Pour nous protéger du soleil, nous avons installé un auvent au-dessus de notre balcon. Ce printemps, je me suis procuré des plantes qui préfèrent l’ombre, entre autres : quelques bégonias, une magnifique et énorme fougère ainsi que d’autres belles plantes pour agrémenter notre balcon. Je désirais créer une ambiance chaleureuse où Robert et moi pourrions nous asseoir pour lire et relaxer parmi de jolies fleurs.

Plus je le regardais, plus j’aimais le bégonia jaune, alors j’ai décidé que j’avais devant moi le sujet idéal à peindre et ainsi relever le fameux défi.

Voici donc, avec un titre fort original … : Le bégonia jaune!

Big Beehive

BigBeeHive640

Big Beehive
Lake Louise, Alta.
Oil on canvas
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2018

On our second visit to the Rockies, we decided to go to Lake Agnes Tea House. From the shores of Lake Louise we began our hike. The trail is a continuous climb on a wide switchback for 3.6 km with an elevation gain of 400 m.

As we started the ascent, light drizzle turned into large snowflakes, covering the evergreens with a fresh blanket of snow. At the same time a rowing team on Lake Louise began to sing O Canada, while someone played the Alphorn. It was a surreal and magical moment I will never forget.

For a while people passed us by. I guess we were too slow for them. Half an hour later, they returned so I figured we were close to the tea house.

So we kept climbing and climbing… no tea house was in sight. I dislike climbing and this was endless. Then, a lake! I thought we had arrived. “Where is the Tea House?”, I asked. Robert pointed up towards a small house in the distance. It took me a while to locate it.

We had arrived at Mirror Lake, a lovely place but we were not at our destination yet. What a disappointment! Robert offered to return, but I refused.

Robert took several photos of the Big Beehive, which is a rock formation seen along the trail near Lake Agnes Tea House. A strange and beautiful view which I tried to depict in this painting.

Before reaching Lake Agnes, the trail was really steep and narrowed quite a bit. We finally arrived and it was worth the effort. Lake Agnes is magnificent!

There was a buzz inside the crowded Tea House, but we managed to find a place to sit. We were tired and hungry. Our apple crisps did not last long and a hot cup of tea sure hit the right spot!

We rested for a short while, then we went on the balcony to look and enjoy the beauty surrounding us. Had I given up half way, I would have missed this spectacular vista of Lake Agnes, the Big Beehive and Mirror Lake.

On our way back, we took our time and savoured the descent.

+ + + +

Big Beehive
Lac Louise, Alb.
Huile sur toile
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2018

Le Salon de Thé du Lac Agnès était une de nos destinations lors de notre seconde visite dans les Rocheuses canadiennes. Le sentier pour s’y rendre débute sur la rive du Lac Louise. C’est une randonnée en zigzag qui monte continuellement sur une distance de 3,6 km sur une élévation de 400 m.

En montant, la bruine légère s’est transformée en de gros flocons de neige qui se sont doucement déposés sur les conifères. Comme si cela n’était pas assez, une équipe de rameurs sur le Lac Louise entreprirent de chanter Ô Canada au son d’un joueur de cor des Alpes. Un moment irréel et magique que je n’oublierai jamais.

Les gens nous dépassaient car nous étions trop lents pour eux. Une demie heure plus tard ils retournaient alors je croyais que nous étions tout près du salon de thé.

Pourtant, la pente continuait de monter et toujours pas de salon de thé. Je n’aime pas monter. Soudain, un lac! “Où est le salon de thé?” demandais-je à Robert. Après un certain temps, il pointa vers une toute petite maison au loin. Cela me prit un certain temps à l’apercevoir.

Nous étions rendus au Lac Miroir. Un bel endroit mais pas de salon de thé! J’étais déçue. Robert offrit de retourner mais j’ai refusé.

Le long du sentier se trouve une montagne étonnante appelée, “Big Beehive”. Sa forme ressemble à une ruche d’abeilles. Robert en a pris plusieurs photos et moi j’ai tenté de reproduire sur toile cette scène à la fois étrange et magnifique.

Juste avant d’atteindre le Lac Agnès, le sentier rétrécit encore et devient très abrupte. Finalement, nous sommes arrivés! Que d’efforts mais cela en valait vraiment la peine. Le Lac Agnès est magnifique!

Le salon de thé était bondé et il y avait une belle ambiance à l’intérieur. Fort heureusement, nous avons déniché une petite place pour nous asseoir. Nous étions fatigués et affamés. Nous avons englouti nos carrés aux pommes à la vitesse de l’éclair. Quel plaisir que de savourer un bon thé chaud en relaxant!

Après la pause, nous sommes allés sur le balcon pour admirer et assimiler toute la beauté qui nous entourait. Si j’avais abandonné à mi-chemin, j’aurais manqué cette vue spectaculaire du Lac Agnès, “Big Beehive” et le Lac Miroir.

Le retour se fit à un bon rythme et nous avons pris le temps de savourer la descente.

Red-winged Blackbird
Carouge à épaulettes

Red-winged Blackbird - Juvenile male 640

Red-winged Blackbird - Juvenile male
Parks Canada - Point Pelee National Park, Ont.
Oil on birch panel
27.3 cm x 27.3 cm (10.75 “ x 10.75”) - 2018


While in Point Pelee National Park, we hiked along several trails and enjoyed the sights and joyous songs of the birds. Robert spotted this bird and took a photo.

Initially, I thought it was a female Red-winged Blackbird but the small patches of red orange on the shoulder revealed that it was a male. He had recently left his nest and was exploring his new world. He was probably still under the watch of his parents for a few more days. As he reaches maturity, his plumage will turn shiny black with bright red orange epaulets, fringed with yellow.

March 13, 2018 - 8:00 am - Our backyard was covered with hungry Red-winged Blackbirds, European Starlings, Brown-headed Cowbirds and Purple Finches. It was exciting to watch the activity. Hearing their songs filled my heart with joy.

The female Red-winged Blackbirds should soon arrive. They follow a few weeks after the males who had time to establish their territories.

Even though we woke up to snow that morning, these birds are sure signs of Spring.

+ + + +

Carouge à épaulettes - mâle juvénile
Parcs Canada - Parc national de la Pointe Pelée, Ont.
Huile sur panneau de bois
27.3 cm x 27.3 cm (10.75 “ x 10.75”) - 2018


Lors de notre visite au Parc national de la Pointe Pelée, nous avons parcouru plusieurs sentiers de randonnée. C’était magnifique de voir les oiseaux et d’entendre leur chant joyeux! Robert aperçut cet oiseau et prit une photo.

Je croyais que c’était une femelle Carouge à épaulettes mais les petites tâches de rouge orangé sur l’épaule m’ont révélé que j’étais en présence d’un mâle. Ayant abandonné le nid, il explorait son nouvel univers. Ses parents devaient le surveiller encore pour quelques jours. Adulte, son plumage deviendra noir brillant et il aura des épaulettes rouge orangé, bordées d’une étroite frange jaune.

Le 13 mars 2018 - 8 h : Une nuée de Carouges à épaulettes, des Étourneaux sansonnets, des Vachers à tête brune ainsi que des Roselins pourprés firent leur apparition dans notre cour arrière. Ils étaient affamés et c’était fascinant de voir tant d’activité dans notre cour. Quel plaisir que d’entendre leur chant mélodieux!

Les femelles Carouge à épaulettes devraient bientôt se pointer. Elles arrivent un peu plus tard, donnant ainsi le temps aux mâles d’établir leurs territoires.

Peu importe si ce matin-là nous nous sommes levés avec une autre bordée de neige. Les oiseaux annoncent l’arrivée du printemps!

Valley of the Ten Peaks
Vallée des Dix Pics

MoraineValley

Valley of the Ten Peaks
Moraine Lake - Canadian Rockies
Banff National Park, Alta.
Oil on canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

Hiking along the trails of Moraine Lake, Robert and I stood silently as we admired this stunning view in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. It was overwhelming and humbling. Nature makes us realize how small and vulnerable we are.

Every time we visit the Rockies, Robert keeps telling me to look up. The dimensions and heights of the glaciers are so high! The scale of it all is mind blowing. The entire park is an endless display of trees, glaciers, rivers, boulders and wildlife.

Nature is magnificent yet it can be unpredictable, threatening and treacherous. A force to be reckoned. One that demands respect.

+ + + +

Vallée des Dix Pics
Lac Moraine - Rocheuses canadiennes
Parc national Banff, Alb.
Huile sur toile
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2018

Lors d’une randonnée le long du Lac Moraine, Robert et moi sommes restés silencieux devant cette scène magnifique dans la Vallée des Dix Pics. C’était bouleversant et on a vite compris combien nous sommes petits et vulnérables.

Chaque fois que nous visitons les Rocheuses, Robert me répète souvent de regarder vers le ciel. L’immensité et la hauteur des glaciers donnent le vertige! C’est renversant. Le parc offre un spectacle impressionnant et nous fait découvrir faune, arbres, glaciers, rivières et rochers.

La beauté époustouflante de la nature est à la fois menaçante, imprévisible et traître. Elle inspire le respect.

Gaspé Peninsula
La Gaspésie

GaspePeninsual640

Gaspé Peninsula, Que.
Oil on canvas
15.24 cm x 60.96 cm (6” x 24”) - 2017

Although we visited the Gaspé Peninsula several years ago, I still remember it like it was yesterday. Such a lovely place to visit!

I love vast spaces, the sky, water and the wind. How I love the wind! It’s comforting and appeasing to my soul.

When my friend Joy saw this painting she said she could imagine the gentle warmth of this place on some days, in contrast to the brisk coolness of other times.

It made her wonder who lives there and what their lives are like. Do they get lonely? A typical scene of this area. Life on the Gaspé.

+ + + +

La Gaspésie, Qc
Huile sur toile
15.24 cm x 60.96 cm (6” x 24”) - 2017

Notre voyage en Gaspésie remonte à plusieurs années mais je m’en souviens comme si c’était hier. Quel bel endroit à voir!

J’aime les vastes espaces, le ciel, la mer et le vent. Que j’aime le vent! Il me rassure et m’apaise.

En voyant cette toile, mon amie Joy a dit pouvoir imaginer une douce brise par une belle journée ensoleillée en contraste avec des jours froids et venteux.

Elle s’est demandée qui vit là-bas? Comment est leur vie? Ressentent-ils l’isolement? Une scène typique de la région. La vie en Gaspésie.

Snowshoeing at Mer Bleue
Raquette à la Mer Bleue

SnowshoeingInMerBleue640

Snowshoeing at Mer Bleue
Conservation area - Eastern Ontario
Oil on gallery canvas
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2017

I debated whether or not to include people in this scene and opted to keep them. Perhaps it’s because Robert and I were right behind them and it reminded me of a fun day.

I remember smiling as I watched them enter into winter wonderland. We enjoy being in nature, listening to the crunch of the snow under our warm boots and feeling the cold air on our face.

Robert and I often go to Mer Bleue to savour peaceful moments in the forest. At the trail entrance, Black-capped Chickadees greet visitors. If you extend your hand with sunflower seeds in your palm, they will pick them up. Often, they will take the time to select the best seeds. For such a small bird, it always amazes me how strong their push is when they take off.

+ + + +

Raquette à la Mer Bleue
Zone de conservation - Est de l’Ontario
Huile sur toile galerie
60.96 cm x 45.72 cm (24” x 18”) - 2017

Malgré mon hésitation, j’ai choisi d’inclure des personnages dans ce tableau. Probablement parce que Robert et moi étions tout juste derrière eux et que le souvenir de cette belle journée m’est revenu.

Je me souviens avoir souri en les voyant s’engouffrer à l’intérieur de cette scène hivernale magique. C’était si plaisant entendre le crissement de la neige sous nos bottes et sentir l’air froid taquiner nos visages.

Nos promenades à la Mer Bleue sont toujours agréables. À l’entrée du sentier, des mésanges à tête noire accueillent les visiteurs en quête de nourriture. Si on leur offre des graines de tournesol, ils viennent les cueillir au creux de notre main. Souvent, ils prennent le temps de choisir les meilleures! Cela m’impressionne toujours de ressentir la forte poussée de ce petit oiseau lorsqu’il prend son envol.

Full Moon
Pleine lune

FullMoon640

Full Moon
Orleans, Ont.
Oil on gallery canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

At dusk, Robert enjoys going out with his camera. He is a good photographer and I am very fortunate to have access to his photos. I was attracted by this full moon scene for its beauty and simplicity. It’s telling me that while we sleep, the Moon watches over us by casting its light to keep us out of the darkness.

I’ve always been fascinated by what goes on in the sky. When I was young, I would lie down on the grass and stare at the moon and the stars, trying to locate constellations and the Milky Way. What a thrill it was to catch sight of a falling star! I felt minuscule as I scrutinized the vast and mysterious sky, yet I found comfort in knowing that I too was part of this magnificent universe.

+ + + +

Pleine lune
Orléans, Ont.
Huile sur toile galerie
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

Robert aime bien profiter du crépuscule pour sortir avec sa caméra. Il est un excellent photographe et je bénéficie de ses photos pour ma peinture. J’aime cette scène avec la pleine lune pour sa beauté et sa simplicité. J’ai l’impression que la Lune veille sur nous et nous éclaire pour nous protéger de la noirceur.

Le ciel m’a toujours fascinée. Enfant, j’aimais laisser courir mon imagination et me perdre dans ce vaste univers où se retrouvent la lune, les étoiles et les planètes. Couchée sur la pelouse, je cherchais les constellations et la Voie lactée. Que c’était excitant apercevoir une étoile filante! Je me sentais minuscule sous ce ciel immense et mystérieux. Et pourtant, cela me rassurait de savoir que je faisais partie de cet univers magnifique.

Red Canoe
Canoë rouge

RedCanoe640

Red Canoe
Lake Louise, Alta.
Oil on canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

On our second trip to the Rockies, we returned to Lake Louise with the firm intention to reach Lake Agnes Tea House. From Chateau Lake Louise, the hike is 7 km (4.5 miles) return, with an elevation gain of 400 metres (1,300 feet). When we finally arrived at the top of the mountain, we were rewarded with a hot apple crumble, a good cup of tea and a spectacular view of Lake Agnes.

We also walked the trail alongside Lake Louise and I found out how cold its limpid turquoise water is!

For me, this peaceful view of Lake Louise is an invitation to meditation. My eyes wander from the empty canoe, glide across the lake towards the background and I lose myself in the abstract designs of the glacier, rocks and trees.

+ + + +

Canoë rouge
Lac Louise, Alb.
Huile sur toile
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

Lors de notre seconde visite dans les Rocheuses, nous sommes retournés au Lac Louise avec la ferme intention de nous rendre au salon de thé du Lac Agnes. Une randonnée de 7 km (4.5 milles) aller-retour avec une élévation de 400 mètres (1,300 pieds). Arrivés au sommet de la montagne, nos efforts furent récompensés par une bonne tasse de thé, une croustade aux pommes et une vue magnifique du Lac Agnes.

Nous avons aussi parcouru le sentier longeant le Lac Louise et j’ai vite appris combien l’eau turquoise et claire est froide!

Cette scène paisible du Lac Louise m’invite à la méditation. Mon regard quitte le canoë et glisse sur l’eau pour atteindre l’arrière plan où je me perds dans les formes abstraites du glacier, des rochers et des arbres.

Hall's Harbour

HallsHarbour

Hall’s Harbour N.S.
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

While staying in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, we visited the Annapolis Valley and the surrounding areas. Hall’s Harbour, which is located along the Bay of Fundy, was on our list of places we had planned to visit.

One day we headed there and had a fantastic lunch at the seafood restaurant near the docks. After our meal, we stayed in the area for a while and walked along the shore, admiring the place. This picturesque harbour inspired me to paint it.

+ + + +

Hall’s Harbour N.-É.
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

Lors de notre séjour à Wolfville dans la Vallée d’Annapolis en Nouvelle-Écosse, nous avons pris plaisir à visiter les environs dont Hall’s Harbour qui est situé le long de la Baie de Fundy.

Arrivés à Hall’s Harbour, nous avons dîné au restaurant de fruits de mer. Plus tard, nous avons marché le long du rivage pour prendre l’air et admirer l’endroit. Ce beau port m’a beaucoup inspiré et j’ai voulu le peindre.

Ready to be picked
Prêtes à cueillir

ReadyToBePicked640

Ready to be picked
Victoria, B.C.
Oil on custom made canvas
38.1 cm x 50.8 cm (15” x 20”) - 2017

Robert and I stayed at a B&B where they had several apple trees on their property. One morning, as we walked to the car I noticed that there were lots of apples on the ground. I looked up and saw this cluster of apples. Such a beautiful theme to paint, right above my head!

+ + + +

Prêtes à cueillir
Victoria, C.-B.
Huile sur toile faite sur mesure
38.1 cm x 50.8 cm (15” x 20”) - 2017

Robert et moi avons séjourné dans une chambre d’hôtes où il y avait plusieurs pommiers sur leur terrain. Un matin, en approchant de l’auto, j’ai remarqué que le sol était recouvert de pommes. En levant les yeux vers le ciel, j’ai aperçu toutes ces belles pommes. Incroyable! Un sujet magnifique à peindre était suspendu juste au-dessus de ma tête!

The Walk

The Walk - Brigus

The Walk
Brigus, N.L.
Oil on canvas
18” x 24” - 2017

We returned to Newfoundland and Labrador for the second time in 2008. We stayed in the village of Brigus for a couple of days.

Upon our arrival in the village, we both fell under its spell. I could have stayed in Brigus for weeks, exploring every corner, every street and sight and learn about it’s history. I wanted to paint the entire village!

It rained most of the time during our stay. One early morning, armed with a good umbrella, we went for a walk in the village. It turned out to be quite pleasant. Heavy fog was slowly lifting. The weather conditions did not alter the beauty of the village. In my opinion, it made it even more charming.

Strolling down the streets filled my heart with joy. Brigus brought me back in time when I was a child living in my hometown of Edmundston, New Brunswick. I felt right at home.

+ + + +

The Walk
Brigus, T.-N.-L.
Huile sur toile
18” x 24” - 2017

En 2008, nous sommes retournés à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador et avons passé quelques jours dans le village de Brigus.

Ce magnifique village nous a séduits! J’aurais voulu y rester des semaines pour prendre le temps de découvrir ses recoins, ses belles rues et apprendre son histoire. Je voulais peindre le village au complet!

La pluie était incessante lors de notre visite mais avec un bon parapluie au-dessus de nos têtes, rien ne nous empêchait de nous balader dans le village. Le brouillard était dense et se dissipait lentement. Le mauvais temps n’altérait en rien la beauté du village. Selon moi, cela le rendait encore plus charmant.

En nous promenant dans les rues, un sentiment de bien-être m’envahit. Brigus m’a ramenée au temps où j’étais une petite fille et je me revoyais dans ma ville natale d’Edmundston au Nouveau-Brunswick. Je me sentais chez-moi.

White Water Lily
Nénuphar blanc

Water Lily 640

White Water Lily
Point Pelee National Park, Ont.
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

In 2015, Robert and I visited Point Pelee National Park during the spring bird migration. It was very hot and humid, but it did not stop us from walking along several trails and enjoying the sights and joyous songs of the birds.

Among the many photos we took were a large variety of aquatic plants found at the “Marsh Boardwalk and Sanctuary Lookout” trail.

I’ve always wanted to paint water lilies but I held back. When I selected the material I wanted to paint for the exhibit, I decided to include water lilies.

As the painting progressed, it brought me back to the day Robert and I spent at Point Pelee and my hesitations vanished.

+ + + +

Nénuphar blanc
Parc national de la Pointe Pelée, Ont.
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

En 2015, Robert et moi avons visité le Parc national de la Pointe Pelée pour voir la migration printanière des oiseaux.

La chaleur et l’humidité étaient au rendez-vous mais cela ne nous a pas empêché de parcourir plusieurs sentiers de randonnée. C’était magnifique de voir les oiseaux et d’entendre leur chant joyeux!

En parcourant le sentier flottant “Marsh Boardwalk and Sanctuary Lookout”, nous avons pris un nombre impressionnant de photos. Parmi celles-ci se retrouvaient plusieurs variétés de plantes aquatiques.

J’ai toujours rêvé de peindre des nénuphars mais j’hésitais. En préparant ma liste de sujets à peindre pour l’exposition, j’ai choisi d’y inclure les nénuphars.

Plus j’avançais dans la peinture, plus le souvenir de cette belle journée passée avec Robert m’habitait et mes hésitations se sont envolées.

Fishing Boat
Bateau de pêche

Fishing Boat, PEI - 640

Fishing Boat
Cape Egmont, P.E.I.
Oil on canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

In June 2012, Robert took photographs of this fishing boat when we visited PEI. On that trip, we took our time discovering many parts of the island. We had great weather and fantastic food all week!

Although I see beauty in all the visual elements of this peaceful scene, I cannot help but think that behind that calm facade lurks danger. To earn a living, I can imagine the fishermen getting ready to leave for the Gulf of St-Lawrence or the Northumberland Strait, fully aware of all the risks involved as the boat leaves the dock.

Sadly, everything that lives in the sea is also at risk.

+ + + +

Bateau de pêche
Cape Egmont, Î.-P.-É.
Huile sur toile
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2017

Lors d’un voyage à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard en juin 2012, Robert a pris quelques photos de ce beau bateau de pêche. Nous avons passé une semaine à découvrir plusieurs endroits sur l’île. La température était idéale et la nourriture fort savoureuse!

Malgré cette scène paisible, je ne peux m’empêcher de penser que derrière cette belle façade se cache le danger. Afin de gagner leur vie, je peux imaginer les pêcheurs se préparer, conscients du risque qu’ils prennent à chaque fois que le bateau quitte le quai vers le golfe du Saint-Laurent ou le détroit de Northumberland.

Malheureusement, tout ce qui vit dans la mer est aussi en péril.

Back Road
Route de campagne

Madoc Back Road 640

Back Road
Madoc, Ont.
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

On a beautiful sunny day a while ago, Robert and I went for a drive near Madoc, Ontario and came across this old barn. Spring had arrived and nature was just awakening. Encouraged by the warmth of the sun, fragile wild flowers and fresh grass were making their appearances. The bare trees would soon be filled with buds and young leaves. Life was stretching itself after a deep winter sleep.

Driving along country roads, you often notice broken fences, rotting fallen trees, huge boulders beside the road and in fields. It is so sad to catch sight of abandoned homes and farms taken over by decay after years of neglect.

Then, as you take the next curve in the road, all the gloominess fades away, replaced by colourful fields that spread as far as the eye can see under a bright sunny sky. You see farm animals, hear the joyful songs of busy birds and notice pretty wild flowers. The country is bursting with life and you fall under the spell of its beauty. It’s inspiring and it fills my heart with joy.

+ + + +

Route de campagne
Madoc, Ont.
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2017

Lors d’une belle journée ensoleillée, Robert et moi avons fait une randonnée dans les environs de Madoc où nous y avons découvert cette belle vieille ferme. C’était le début du printemps. Encouragées par la chaleur du soleil, les fleurs sauvages encore fragiles et la nouvelle herbe faisaient leur timide apparition. Les arbres dénudés seraient bientôt recouverts de bourgeons et de feuilles. La nature semblait s’étirer paresseusement après un long sommeil hivernal.

En parcourant la campagne, on voit beaucoup de clôtures brisées, des arbres morts en décomposition et d’énormes pierres solidement ancrées sur les terres. Il est triste d’apercevoir tellement de fermes abandonnées qui croulent sous le poids des années.

Et puis, au prochain virage, la grisaille s’estompe comme par magie et sous un ciel lumineux, des champs aux couleurs vives s’étendent à l’infini. On y voit des animaux de ferme, on entend le chant des oiseaux affairés et on découvre de jolies fleurs des champs. La campagne déborde alors de vie et on tombe sous le charme de sa beauté. Cela m’inspire et me rend joyeuse.

Drifter

Drifter640

Drifter
Pemberton, B.C.
Oil on custom-made canvas
71.12 cm x 52.07 cm (28” x 20.5”) - 2017

Drifter belonged to my friend Brenda who lives in Pemberton, British Columbia. His coat colour is Sorrel, with the pattern type Tobiano.

In 2014, I had the privilege of spending some time with Drifter when Robert and I visited BC for the first time. He was such a gentle and magnificent horse.

I asked Brenda if she had pictures of horses I could paint and she sent me several. There was one photo of a relaxed Drifter enjoying a peaceful moment, grazing on fresh grass, that I very much wanted to paint but I was not yet ready, not until 3 weeks ago that is. I could no longer ignore Drifter’s call. I had to paint him.

With each brushstroke, I cannot express the joy and excitement I felt as I watched Drifter slowly appear on the canvas. It was inspiring and overwhelming. I could hear him breathe and chew as he pulled the grass from the ground. I imagined a soft breeze among the Aspen trees and I could smell the air on that beautiful day.

+ + + +

Drifter
Pemberton, C.-B.
Huile sur toile faite sur mesure
71.12 cm x 52.07 cm (28” x 20.5”) - 2017


Drifter appartenait à mon amie, Brenda qui habite à Pemberton en Colombie-Britannique.

Robert et moi avons visité la Colombie-Britannique pour la première fois en 2014. C’est alors que j’ai eu le privilège de passer un peu de temps avec ce magnifique cheval au tempérament doux.

J’avais le goût de peindre des chevaux alors j’ai demandé à Brenda de m’envoyer quelques photos de ses chevaux. J’ai eu un coup de foudre pour celle de Drifter devant les trembles, alors qu’il profitait d’un moment de répit pour brouter l’herbe fraîche. Je désirais tellement le peindre mais je n’étais pas prête. Et puis, il y a trois semaines, je ne pouvais plus ignorer l’appel de Drifter. Je devais le peindre.

Entre chaque coup de pinceau, Drifter faisait lentement son apparition sur la toile. C’était à la fois inspirant et bouleversant. Je pouvais l’entendre respirer et broyer l’herbe fraîche qu’il arrachait du sol. J’imaginais une douce brise se faufiler au travers les feuilles des trembles et je pouvais sentir l’air de cette splendide journée.

Great Blue Heron
Grand héron

Great Blue Heron

GREAT BLUE HERON
Salt Spring Island - B.C.
Acrylic on gallery canvas
60.96 cm x 50.8 cm (24” x 20”) - 2016

September 2016: Robert and I were in Salt Spring Island on vacation. It was our second trip to BC, the first time being during the fall of 2014.

While waiting for the restaurant to open its doors for diner, we strolled along the quay to look at the sailboats. Lower down on the dock, much to our delight, standing on one leg was a Great Blue Heron. At first it was facing the ocean, but then it turned towards us. Oblivious to our presence, it combed the fluffy feathers on its chest and preened itself tirelessly. Then, still standing on one leg, it stood motionless on the corner of the dock for a very long time giving Robert the opportunity to take several photos. I had the luxury to study the details of its plumage and appreciate the graceful stance of this majestic bird.

Over the years, Robert and I have spotted many Great Blue Herons fishing along rivers or streams. I did not know they could be found near oceans as well. We have previously seen Great Blue Herons during a canoe trip along the Grand River in Cambridge, in the wetlands of Petrie Island near home in Orléans, at Chaffey’s Lock near Kingston, at the waterfalls in the village of Yarker and in Point Pelee National Park. Sometimes, they fly over our house.

Males and females look alike, the female being smaller. Since this heron was alone, I cannot tell. I believe it is an immature heron because it has some brown feathers, no black feathers stemming from the back of its head and its bill is of a grey/yellowish colour.

I could have painted this Great Blue heron in its natural habitat but something stopped me. The awkwardness of the scene appealed to me. Its intense and troubling stare was uncomfortable and it felt unsettling that it had its back turned to the Pacific Ocean. Because of the growing loss of its natural habitat, like so many creatures, this magnificent bird had to find refuge somewhere else.

+ + + +

GRAND HÉRON
Salt Spring Island - C.-B.
Acrylique sur toile galerie
60.96 cm x 50.8 cm (24” x 20”) - 2016

Septembre 2016: Robert et moi étions en vacances à Salt Spring Island. C’était notre second voyage en Colombie-Britannique, la première fois étant à l’automne 2014.

En attendant que le restaurant ouvre ses portes pour le souper, nous en avons profité pour nous balader le long du quai et regarder les voiliers. Une belle surprise nous attendait au bout du quai. Debout sur une patte, se trouvait ce Grand Héron. Au début, il faisait face à l’océan Pacifique. Puis il s’est tourné vers nous et ignorant notre présence, il entreprit de faire sa toilette. Il prit un temps incroyable à lisser les plumes sur sa poitrine. La tâche terminée, il demeura longtemps immobile, donnant la chance à Robert de prendre plusieurs photos. Quant à moi, j’ai eu le loisir d’étudier son beau plumage et admirer la posture gracieuse de ce magnifique oiseau.

Au fil des ans, nous avons repéré plusieurs hérons pêchant le long d’une rivière ou d’un cours d’eau. J’ignorais que l’on pouvait les retrouver près des océans. Nous en avons aperçu plusieurs par le passé, soit lors d’un voyage en canoe le long de la Grand River à Cambridge; dans les marécages de l’Île Pétrie à Orléans tout près d’où nous habitons, Chaffey’s Lock non loin de Kingston; aux chutes du village de Yarker et au Parc national de la Pointe Pelée. Parfois, les hérons survolent au-dessus de chez-nous.

Le mâle et la femelle se ressemblent sauf qu’elle est plus petite. Ce héron étant seul, je ne peut dire. Je crois que c’est un jeune héron puisqu’il a encore des plumes brunes, par l’absence de plumes noires derrière sa tête et par la couleur terne de son bec.

J’aurais pu peindre ce héron dans son habitat naturel mais quelque chose m’a retenue. Son regard fixe et perçant était insoutenable et c’était troublant qu’il ait tourné le dos à l’océan Pacifique. Puisque l’étendue de son habitat naturel diminue sans cesse, ce magnifique oiseau doit chercher refuge ailleurs, comme tant d’autres créatures.

Red-tailed Hawk
Buse à queue rousse

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk
Navan, Ont.
Acrylic on canvas
25.4 cm x 50.8 cm (10” x 20”) - 2016

Spring 2015 - On our way home, Robert and I saw this Red-tailed Hawk standing next to a ruptured bale of hay at the edge of a farmer’s field. Robert always carries his camera, so he took pictures of this handsome bird of prey. We often see Red-tail Hawks in the area east of Ottawa, especially during the spring migration.

Watching Mr. Bateman work with acrylics gave me the desire to learn and experiment that medium. So I painted the Red-tailed Hawk with acrylics to see how it would turn out. Using acrylics is new to me, so if I was not satisfied with the final painting it would still be good practice, and I could always redo the picture in oil. I love working with oils, and find it challenging to paint with a different medium. Change is not easy.

+ + + +

Buse à queue rousse
Navan, Ont.
Acrylique sur toile
25.4 cm x 50.8 cm (10” x 20”) - 2016

Printemps 2015 - En retournant à la maison, Robert et moi avons aperçu cette Buse à queue rousse. Elle se tenait tout près d’une meule de foin brisée sur le bord d’une terre agricole. Comme Robert transporte toujours sa caméra avec lui, il prit quelques photos de ce bel oiseau de proie. Nous apercevons souvent des Buses à queue rousse dans la région de l’est d’Ottawa, surtout lors de la migration printanière.

Surveiller monsieur Bateman peindre à l’acrylique m’a donné le goût d’explorer cette technique. Aussi, j’ai choisi de peindre la Buse à queue rousse à l’acrylique pour voir comment je m’en sortirais. Je me suis dit que si la toile devait “mal tournée” que ce serait quand même une belle expérience et que je pouvais toujours la refaire à l’huile. J’aime travailler avec l’huile et c’est tout un défi pour moi d’explorer l’acrylique. C’est difficile le changement!

Fallen Tree
La chute d'un arbre

Fallen Tree - Acrylics 640

Fallen Tree (Study)
Blue Mountain, Ont.
Acrylic on masonite board
20.32 cm x 25.4 cm (8” x 10”) - 2016

In 2016, I attended a 4 day workshop at Fleming College - The Haliburton School of Art + Design. The workshop Passion and Practices was given by world renowned artist, Robert Bateman.

Attending this workshop was a dream come true for me, and I am grateful to have had the opportunity to learn as I watched this great artist at work. Mr. Bateman works mainly with acrylics, so I paid extra attention to what he was doing since this was new to me.

Mr. Bateman demonstrated his approach to painting. All we had to do was to listen, take notes and watch him work. At 86 years of age, he is amazingly energetic and is quite generous in sharing stories of all sorts!

I had the pleasure of meeting Joy McCallister at the workshop. Through our mutual passion for painting, we became friends. We now exchange views and progress about our recent paintings. Joy is a talented artist and her work reveals her zest for life.

Back home after the workshop, I purchased acrylic paints to give them a try. For this painting, I only used Titanium White and Payne’s Grey - no colour.

I have wanted to paint this scene for a long time but for some bizarre reason I kept putting it off. I finally decided to paint it with acrylics as a study for later work. I enjoyed the experience and will continue to explore that medium. 

I tried to “listen" and incorporate Mr. Bateman’s advice as much as I could. I doubt he would approve of the fallen tree that splits the canvas in 2 triangles, but that is exactly what appealed to me. In my view, this scene is a metaphor of life.

+ + + +

La chute d’un arbre (Étude)
Blue Mountain, Ont.
Acrylique sur panneau masonite
20.32 cm x 25.4 cm (8” x 10”) - 2016

En 2016, j’ai eu le privilège de participer à un atelier au Fleming College - The Haliburton School of Art + Design d'une durée de 4 jours. L’artiste peintre de renommée internationale, Robert Bateman était au rendez-vous pour parler : Passion and Practices.

Participer à cet atelier était la réalisation d’un rêve pour moi et je suis reconnaissante d’avoir eu la chance d’écouter et voir ce grand peintre à l’oeuvre. Monsieur Bateman travaille surtout avec l’acrylique et comme c’est un domaine inconnu pour moi, j’observais attentivement sa technique de travail.

Monsieur Bateman nous a parlé et démontré sont approche envers la peinture. Quant à nous les participants, notre rôle était d’écouter, de prendre des notes et le regarder travailler. Âgé de 86 ans, monsieur Bateman est plein d’énergie et il aime partager des histoires de toutes sortes!

Lors de l’atelier, j’ai eu le plaisir de faire la connaissance de Joy McCallister. Au travers notre passion mutuelle pour la peinture, nous sommes devenues des amies. Nous échangeons maintenant des opinions et conseils sur la progression de nos toiles. Les tableaux de Joy nous révèlent son beau talent de peintre et sa joie de vivre.

De retour à la maison une fois l’atelier terminé, j’ai acheté tout le matériel d’artiste nécessaire pour peindre à l’acrylique. Puis, je me suis lancée dans ce nouvel univers. J’ai choisi de peindre la scène avec du blanc titane et du gris de Payne - aucune couleur.

J’ai toujours voulu peindre cette scène mais pour une raison qui m’échappe, je la remettais toujours à plus tard. J’ai enfin décidé d’en faire une étude à l’acrylique. J’ai aimé l’expérience et je vais continuer d’explorer ce medium.

J’ai essayé d’appliquer les conseils de monsieur Bateman. Cependant, je doute qu’il approuve de l’arbre tombé qui tranche la toile en 2 triangles. Pourtant c’est bien ce qui m’interpelle dans ce tableau qui pour moi représente une métaphore de la vie.

Mel and Spunky
Mel et Spunky

Mel and Spunky640

Mel and Spunky
Nicola Valley, B.C.
Oil on canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2016

In 1937, at the age of 23, Mel worked on a cattle ranch known as Guichon Ranch at that time.

Unknown was the name of Mel’s magnificent horse, so I named it Spunky for its energy and courage.

+ + + +

Mel et Spunky
Nicola Valley, C.-B.
Huile sur toile
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2016

En 1937, Mel alors âgé de 23 ans, travaillait dans un ranch où se faisait l’exploitation bovine. À l’époque, le ranch portait le nom de Guichon Ranch.

Le nom du magnifique cheval de Mel étant inconnu, je l’ai appelé Spunky pour son énergie et son courage.

Low Tide
Marée basse


LowTide640

Low Tide
Peggy’s Cove, N.S.
Oil on canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2016

Robert and I visited Nova Scotia in 2011.

As a Maritimer and a painter, I am drawn to fishing villages. Their beauty is inspiring and so is their story. Unfortunately, they are facing an uncertain future. All over the world, oceans and what lives in them are at risk. I fear their disappearance.

+ + + +

Marée basse
Peggy’s Cove, N.-É.
Huile sur toile
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2016


En 2011, Robert et moi, avons visité la Nouvelle-Écosse.

Non seulement je suis un peintre mais je suis une fille des maritimes. Les villages des pêcheurs m’inspirent pour leur beauté, leur vécu et leur combat face à un avenir incertain. Tous les océans de la planète ainsi que tout ce qui y vit sont en péril. Je crains leur disparition.

Western Gulls
Goélands d'Audubon

Western Gulls640

Western Gulls
Vancouver Harbour, B.C.
Oil on gallery canvas
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2016

I have read there are over 27 species of gulls, so I cannot say for certain which type these are. I am a humble beginner, but after an elimination process there were probably 3 species that fit the criteria. I believe that these are Western Gulls, one an adult and the other a juvenile. Please correct me if I am wrong.

For a long time, I wanted to paint these seagulls because I find them interesting and funny with their inquisitive attitude. The photograph that inspired the painting was taken by my friend, Brenda.

I had been working on another painting depicting Northern Gannets and I was struggling with it, so I decided to put it aside and start a different painting. These seagulls were the medicine I needed. My frustrations vanished and I was happy again. I returned to the gannets with fresh eyes and renewed energy.

+ + + +

Goélands d’Audubon
Port de Vancouver, C.-B.
Huile sur toile galerie
40.64 cm x 50.8 cm (16” x 20”) - 2016

J’ai lu qu’il existe au-delà de 27 espèces de mouettes alors il m’est difficile d’identifier avec certitude ces deux oiseaux. Je ne suis qu’une humble débutante mais selon les critères d’identification, je crois que ce sont des Goélands d’Audubon - un adulte et un juvénile. N’hésitez surtout pas à me corriger si je suis dans l’erreur.

Je désirais peindre ces oiseaux au regard inquisiteur depuis un certain temps car je les trouve intéressants et drôles. Je me suis inspirée d’une photo de mon amie, Brenda, pour exécuter ce tableau.

Je travaillais sur une autre toile, ayant pour sujet les Fous de Bassan et j’éprouvais certaines difficultés. Frustrée, j’ai mis la toile de côté pour en entreprendre une autre, dont Les Goélands d’Audubon. Cela m’a remonté le moral et mes frustrations se sont volatilisées. J’ai repris les Fous de Bassan avec un nouveau regard et un élan plein d’énergie.

Black Tern Nesting
Guifette noire couvant son nid

BlackTern640

Black Tern Nesting
Point Pelee National Park, Ont.
Oil on gallery canvas
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2016

June 2015 - Robert and I visited Point Pelee National Park to discover this internationally renowned park, known for its wide range of bird species, especially during the spring and autumn migrations. The month of May is considered to be the peak spring migration period.

Despite hot humid weather, we roamed over several trails and enjoyed the sights and joyous songs of the birds.

Several Black Terns were nesting close to the “Marsh Boardwalk and Sanctuary Lookout” trail. A park staffer informed us that it was unusual for these small birds to nest so close to the boardwalk. To protect their territory, the terns repeatedly flew over people’s heads.

To respect the birds’ privacy and minimize our disturbance, we stood still and quiet while observing them. It was a privilege to witness, hidden among the aquatic plants of the marsh, this handsome bird incubating its eggs on a floating nest. Once again, we were under nature’s spell.

Find out more about the Black Tern at Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

+ + + +

Guifette noire couvant son nid
Parc national de la Pointe Pelée, Ont.
Huile sur toile galerie
45.72 cm x 60.96 cm (18” x 24”) - 2016

Juin 2015 - Robert et moi avons visité le Parc national de la Pointe Pelée. Lors des migrations au printemps et à l’automne, ce parc de renommée internationale procure un abri à un large éventail d’espèces d’oiseaux. Le mois de mai étant le sommet de la migration au printemps.

Sous un temps chaud et humide, nous avons parcouru plusieurs sentiers de randonnée. Quelle joie d’apercevoir les oiseaux et d’écouter leur chant joyeux!

De nombreuses guifettes noires nichaient le long du sentier flottant “Marsh Boardwalk and Sanctuary Lookout”. Une employée du parc nous a expliqué que c’était inhabituel. Afin de protéger leur territoire, les oiseaux le survolaient au-dessus de la tête des gens.

Par respect pour leur intimité et surtout pour éviter de les perturber, nous sommes demeurés immobiles et silencieux. Quel privilège d’observer pour la première fois, camouflé parmi les plantes aquatiques du marais, ce bel oiseau noir couvant ses oeufs sur son nid flottant! Une fois de plus, nous sommes tombés sous le charme de la nature.

Pour en savoir plus, visitez: Ministère des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts de l’Ontario.